Just a Barnard Baby

ABOUT

Founded on the auspicious 11th of November, in the year 2011, Barnard Baby has blogged about provincial life in the small rural hamlet of New York City since arriving at the gates of the inimitable Barnard College with a vial of White Men's Tears in her pocket and a pair of sensible size 6 1/2 boots on her feet.

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Dubbed Mother of Prospies by the ever elusive Seer Overheard on the 22nd of July, in the 13th year of the 2nd millennia.

Ask her a question or engage in some conversation. But beware. She may offer you tea.

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Just a Barnard Baby

Walking off my tired feet

Pounding 42nd street

To be in a show
Elsewhere
Jose Rizal Theme by Jeeddii.
hey jo, quick question. i can work on a production crew for a show without taking a class or being a theatre major, right?
Asked by teslawasrobbed

Yep.

2 Notes | Posted on April 12, 2014

There is something to be said about living in translation. There are words and sentiments in Chinese that cannot be done justice by English. There are words in English, which have no parallel in Chinese. I grew up between these two paradigms. I learned how to adapt, how to code switch—I learned how to survive in a world that objectifies the language of my heritage and that doubts my ownership of the language of my country. Language has been denied to me on both fronts, sometimes in obvious, sometimes in bizarre ways. White people are surprised by how well I speak English. Taiwanese-American kids I knew back in high school, so worried about their own place in the diaspora, would argue that my Mandarin wasn’t Taiwanese enough. Wasn’t authentic enough. Folks who took a year of classes in Chinese just love to throw obscure phrases that they’ve learned at me, hoping to win a competition they’ve imagined in their heads. I grew up exhausted by language. I both desired and hated what I could and could not have, whether it was the words I knew or the thoughts I could not translate.And yet, there is something wondrous about living in that chaos. In being forced to craft a new way of speaking, a new way of thinking. Those of us living in the diaspora have formed our own language, one littered with words and phrases from the tongues we know, one with accents exaggerated and appreciated. It’s a battle to reclaim what was lost to us, the pieces of our identity that have been taken from us, but sometimes it’s more than that. Sometimes, it’s a rebellion.

There is something to be said about living in translation. There are words and sentiments in Chinese that cannot be done justice by English. There are words in English, which have no parallel in Chinese. I grew up between these two paradigms. I learned how to adapt, how to code switch—I learned how to survive in a world that objectifies the language of my heritage and that doubts my ownership of the language of my country. 

Language has been denied to me on both fronts, sometimes in obvious, sometimes in bizarre ways. White people are surprised by how well I speak English. Taiwanese-American kids I knew back in high school, so worried about their own place in the diaspora, would argue that my Mandarin wasn’t Taiwanese enough. Wasn’t authentic enough. Folks who took a year of classes in Chinese just love to throw obscure phrases that they’ve learned at me, hoping to win a competition they’ve imagined in their heads. I grew up exhausted by language. I both desired and hated what I could and could not have, whether it was the words I knew or the thoughts I could not translate.

And yet, there is something wondrous about living in that chaos. In being forced to craft a new way of speaking, a new way of thinking. Those of us living in the diaspora have formed our own language, one littered with words and phrases from the tongues we know, one with accents exaggerated and appreciated. It’s a battle to reclaim what was lost to us, the pieces of our identity that have been taken from us, but sometimes it’s more than that. Sometimes, it’s a rebellion.

69 Notes | Posted on April 10, 2014 jochiang
Idk why but I just have an urge to tell the Barnard admitted student who feels like she won't fit in that I think she will definitely find her like kind there and feeling anxious about it is just natural :) Everything will work out with where ever she goes and what ever she does :)
Asked by Anonymous
1 Notes | Posted on April 07, 2014
hey if anyone has any questions about queer life at barnard you can refer them to me I'm a certified gay baby
Asked by youngandwhiteandfree

heyo

2 Notes | Posted on April 04, 2014
I was recently accepted to Barnard after months of perhaps overestimating how well I'll fit in. As I look through the Class of 2018 page I can't help but feel like I won't fit in with the girls at all. There's so much talk of TV show fandoms, obsessions with tea/coffee, and generally other Tumblr-esque topics that I don't necessarily relate to. The girls seem incredibly kind and wonderful, but tbh I get a little annoyed with the topics of conversation. Should I be worried at all?
Asked by Anonymous

Honestly, I’m not sure how to answer you. The students at Barnard aren’t a homogenous mob of any particular identity. There are so many people here with such a diverse number of interests that I find it unfair to judge a class based on posts on a facebook page. People are so much more complex than what they share on social media.

I mean fandom and tea are totally my jam, but I’m so much more than that. They are too.

azuredome said: 

also it’s hard to make conversation with a whole bunch of girls you don’t know! talking about tv shows is like a nice thing lots of people have in common

americanhistoryquotes said:

Also keep in mind that those are the girls who are /using/ the Facebook group. There are likely girls who do not use social media to connect who are also going to Barnard. Not that social media is bad, but you’re getting a skewed sample. :)

4 Notes | Posted on April 04, 2014
Hi! I'm very happy to say that I was accepted to Barnard RD & it's like a dream come true and hopefully I'll be attending next year, but the fact that I won't be receiving merit aid kinda sucks. How are you financing your education? Any tips for staying on budget in NYC?
Asked by satisfiedwithimperfections

Get a job. Either a part-time job on-campus through work study, and off-campus job, a paid internship, Barnard Babysitting, Barnard Codes, or Barnard Bartending. NYC is an expensive place, and you’ll need the funds for books and materials and transportation at the barest minimum. When you’re off the meal plan, you’ll need it for groceries as well (Trader Joes is, surprisingly, a life saver).

And that’s not counting the fact that you want to enjoy your time here. You want to see shows, go to events, have adventures. A lot of it takes money. At the same time, there are ways to enjoy yourself w/o shelling out cash. You just have to dig a little deeper into the city, but that’s part of the fun.

americanhistoryquotes said:

Jobs: great. Loans: also acceptable. They give you Stafford Subsidized Loans, but if you really need to, you can take out other loans. One year I took out a Subsidized, Unsubsidized and a Perkins. Helped a lot.

2 Notes | Posted on April 04, 2014
So I'm deciding between UCLA and barnard (polar-opposites, I know) and I was wondering what the benefits of going to a small college are compared to a big university. Also how internship opportunities are in NYC?
Asked by awaiting-fufillment

Internship opportunities in NYC are phenomenal. It’s both overwhelming and nervewracking, since the very fact that there are internships everywhere contributes to the pressure to always have one. But it’s so worth it.

As for the benefits, it’s really to each their own. I adore having small classes, and there’s something to be said about getting to know so many people in your class. It’s an interesting sort of intimacy, since even thought Barnard is considered a small college, 2k+ students is still a hell of a lot of people.

It’s all relative I suppose.

1 Notes | Posted on April 04, 2014
Are there very few transfers at Barnard? Is there a usual place people transfer from or is it really kind of from anywhere?
Asked by Anonymous

There are a number of transfer students at Barnard. It’s definitely not rare. I’ve met students from all over, so I don’t think it can be said that our transfers come from any usual place.

1 Notes | Posted on April 04, 2014
do you know anything about getting involved in wbar/cu publications?
Asked by Anonymous

anuradha18 does WBAR and azuredome does Bwog. Hit them up.

Posted on April 04, 2014
hey hey, first off, thanks for the incredibly well-organized and informative blog! infinitely better than college prowler and the like. i was wondering if you had any friends who were double majors in art history (concentration in visual arts) and something else? i'd really love to double major, but i don't know if the studio classes would be overwhelming to balance with another major's workload
Asked by Anonymous

Decide when you get here. You have so much time to figure it out, so give yourself some space to explore. If the workload is too much, it’s too much. If it’s manageable, it’s manageable. You won’t know until you’re here.

Posted on April 04, 2014